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INDICATIONS

Frequently Asked Questions

FAQS ABOUT
DVT/PE AND ELIQUIS

If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with DVT/PE, it’s
understandable that you may have questions. Here are some answers to help you know more about the condition, the
role of blood thinners, and ELIQUIS.

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1

SOME COMMON QUESTIONS ABOUT DVT/PE

DVT is a blood clot in a deep vein—usually in the leg, thigh, or pelvis, but they can also occur in the arm—that limits the flow of blood in veins. Sometimes a DVT blood clot can break free and travel to the lungs. This is known as a PE. A PE blood clot can limit the flow of blood in the lungs and can even cause sudden death. DVT and PE can happen more than once.

To learn more, watch the video below.

What Are

DVT and PE?

Both DVT and PE are fairly common. In 2010, it was estimated that each year there are as many as 900,000 adults in the U.S. with DVT/PE. About one third of DVT/PE events are PE.

DVT and PE are a public health concern:

  • PE can cause sudden death in about 25% of cases

  • Up to 100,000 patients in the U.S. are estimated to die due to DVT/PE each year

  • Within 1 month of diagnosis, 10% – 30% of patients die due to DVT/PE

Pulmonary embolism (PE): The most serious risk from DVT is PE. A PE clot can limit the flow of blood in the lungs and can even cause sudden death.

DVT and/or PE can happen more than once. About 33% of patients with DVT or PE have a recurrence within 10 years of their first DVT or PE.

To learn more, watch the video below.

What Is the

Risk of DVT/PE

happening
again?

Doctors may use multiple tests to find out if you have DVT or PE.

Usually, a diagnosis of DVT and/or PE is based upon:

Medical history: Includes questions about your overall health and any prescription medicines you’re taking.

Physical exam : A doctor will examine your legs for signs of DVT and evaluate your blood pressure, your heart, and your lungs.

Test results: Certain tests can help diagnose DVT and PE. Some of the common ones include:

  • Ultrasound: Doctors can use ultrasound to look for blood clots in your legs and pelvis. Ultrasound uses sound waves to check blood flow in your veins

  • CT scans: The test uses X-rays and allows doctors to detect most cases of PE

  • D-dimer test: A blood test that measures a substance in the blood that’s released when a blood clot dissolves

The most common DVT treatments and PE treaments are anticoagulants, otherwise known as blood thinners. Blood thinners treat deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) by reducing the ability of the blood to clot and reducing the risk of further clots developing.

Here are some commonly prescribed blood thinners for DVT/PE and some of the differences between them. You can also
learn about the clinical trials that compared ELIQUIS with LOVENOX® (enoxaparin)
followed by warfarin.

LOVENOX® (enoxaparin) is a blood thinner that is only available in injectable form.

Warfarin is a pill that’s taken orally. Patients taking warfarin have to follow certain dietary restrictions. Warfarin also requires patients to go for routine INR blood testing to check if their levels are within the target range and to adjust their warfarin dose if they’re not.

DOACs (direct-acting oral anticoagulants), including ELIQUIS, are blood thinners that can help treat DVT and PE clots and reduce the risk of them happening again. ELIQUIS can be taken with or without food, meaning taking it does not need to be timed to a meal. Unlike LOVENOX®, which is injected, ELIQUIS is taken by mouth twice daily. And unlike warfarin, ELIQUIS has no dietary restrictions and does not require routine INR blood testing. Find out how ELIQUIS may help.

Other things that may help:

Keep moving—If you’ve been on bed rest because of surgery or other factors, start moving as soon as your doctor says you’re ready, to help reduce the risk of getting another clot

Stay active on long trips—Long plane or car trips are known to increase the risk of DVT or PE. Move your legs frequently by walking or stretching your legs while sitting

Wear compression stockings—if your doctor recommends, to help reduce the risk of blood clots in the legs

Follow your doctor's recommendations—Talk to your doctor about certain lifestyle changes to help reduce the risk of DVT and PE, such as maintaining a healthy weight or staying active

*Adapted from: Mayo Clinic. Deep Vein Thrombosis.


2

SOME COMMON QUESTIONS ABOUT ELIQUIS

Some important safety information to know about ELIQUIS is: (1) Do not stop taking ELIQUIS without talking to the doctor who prescribed it for you. For patients taking ELIQUIS for atrial fibrillation: stopping ELIQUIS increases your risk of having a stroke. Talk to your healthcare team before any surgery, medical, or dental procedures. (2) ELIQUIS can cause bleeding, which can be serious, and rarely may lead to death. This is because ELIQUIS is a blood thinner medicine that reduces blood clotting. While taking ELIQUIS, you may bruise more easily and it may take longer than usual for any bleeding to stop. (3) People who take ELIQUIS and have medicine injected into their spinal or epidural area, or have a spinal puncture, have a risk of forming a blood clot that can cause long-term or permanent loss of the ability to move (paralysis). (4) A reaction to ELIQUIS can cause hives, rash, itching, and possibly trouble breathing. If you get this reaction, it will usually happen soon after you take a dose of ELIQUIS. Get medical help right away if you have sudden chest pain or chest tightness, have sudden swelling of your face or tongue, have trouble breathing, wheezing, or feeling dizzy or faint. This is not a complete list of all important safety information. Please see full Important Safety Information, including Boxed WARNINGS, for ELIQUIS (apixaban). Please see the U.S. Prescribing Information, including Boxed WARNINGS, and the Medication Guide for ELIQUIS (apixaban).

ELIQUIS is a type of blood thinner medicine known as an anticoagulant. Learn more about anticoagulants above.

Your doctor will decide the duration of your treatment. After at least 6 months of treatment for DVT/PE, your doctor may ask you to continue on a lower dose of ELIQUIS to help reduce the risk of them happening again. How long one takes ELIQUIS generally varies from patient to patient. Your doctor will decide the appropriate length of treatment for you.

Do not stop taking ELIQUIS without talking to the doctor who prescribed it to you. For patients taking ELIQUIS: stopping ELIQUIS increases your risk of having a stroke.

Talk to your healthcare team before any medical procedures. ELIQUIS may need to be stopped before surgery, or a medical or dental procedure. Your doctor will tell you when you should stop taking ELIQUIS and when you may start taking it again. If you have to stop taking ELIQUIS your doctor may prescribe another medicine to help prevent a blood clot from forming.

See Important Safety Information below

In patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE), ELIQUIS helps prevent blood clots from getting larger as
the body naturally reabsorbs them, and
helps reduce the risk of them happening
again. ELIQUIS selectively blocks one clotting
factor, Factor Xa, and this makes it less likely
that blood clots will form.

View a video to learn more about how ELIQUIS works.

Patients taking ELIQUIS do not need to have routine INR (International Normalized Ratio) blood testing.

Patients taking ELIQUIS do not have any known dietary restrictions, such as leafy greens.

ELIQUIS may need to be stopped before surgery, or a medical or dental procedure. Your doctor will tell you when you should stop taking ELIQUIS and when you may start taking it again. If you have to stop taking ELIQUIS your doctor may prescribe another medicine to help prevent a blood clot from forming. Be sure to talk to your doctor before any surgeries or procedures, and if you have questions about stopping ELIQUIS before surgery.

Do not stop taking ELIQUIS without talking to the doctor who prescribed it to you. Stopping ELIQUIS increases your risk of having a stroke.

See Important Safety Information below

Determining the price you may pay for a medicine can be complicated and depends on many different factors, such as
insurance coverage. For more information,
view Pricing Information for ELIQUIS.

ELIQUIS can cause bleeding, which can be serious, and rarely may lead to death. This is because ELIQUIS is a blood thinner medicine that reduces blood clotting. While taking ELIQUIS, you may bruise more easily and it may take longer than usual for any bleeding to stop.

You may have a higher risk of bleeding if you take ELIQUIS with other medicines that increase your risk of bleeding, such as:

  • Aspirin
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (called NSAIDs)
  • Warfarin
  • Heparin
  • Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs)
  • Other medicines to help prevent or treat blood clots

Tell your doctor if you take any of these medicines.

Call your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of these signs or symptoms of bleeding when taking ELIQUIS:

  • Unexpected bleeding or bleeding

    that lasts a long time, such as:
    • Unusual bleeding from
      the gums
    • Nosebleeds that
      happen often
    • Menstrual or vaginal
      bleeding
      that is heavier
      than normal
  • Bleeding that is severe or you cannot control
  • Red, pink, or brown urine
  • Red or black stools (looks like tar)
  • Coughing up or vomiting blood
  • Vomit that looks like coffee grounds
  • Unexpected pain, swelling, or joint pain
  • Headaches
  • Feeling dizzy or weak

See Important Safety Information below


Back to Top

Important facts about
ELIQUIS® (apixaban) This is a summary of important safety information that you need
to know about ELIQUIS.

Look out for the following
icons as
you read:

Talk to your healthcare team

Call a healthcare provider right away

Helpful information to remember

Do not stop taking ELIQUIS without talking to the doctor who prescribed it to you For patients taking ELIQUIS for atrial fibrillation: stopping
ELIQUIS increases your risk of having a stroke.

Talk to your healthcare team before any medical procedures. ELIQUIS may need to be stopped before surgery or a
medical or dental procedure. Your doctor will tell you when you should stop taking ELIQUIS and when you may start
taking it again.
If you have to stop taking ELIQUIS, your doctor may prescribe another medicine to help prevent a blood
clot from forming.


What are the possible serious side effects of ELIQUIS? This is a list of some of the serious side effects of ELIQUIS.

Bleeding

ELIQUIS can cause bleeding, which can be serious, and rarely may lead to death. This is because ELIQUIS is a blood thinner medicine that reduces blood clotting. While taking ELIQUIS, you may bruise more easily and it may take longer than usual for any bleeding to stop.

You may have a higher risk of bleeding if you take ELIQUIS with other medicines that increase your risk of bleeding, such as:

  • Aspirin
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory
    drugs (called NSAIDs)
  • Warfarin
  • Heparin
  • Selective serotonin reuptake
    inhibitors (SSRIs) or serotonin
    norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs)
  • Other medicines to help prevent or treat blood clots

Tell your doctor if you take any of these medicines.

Call your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of these signs or symptoms of bleeding when taking ELIQUIS:

  • Unexpected bleeding or bleeding

    that lasts a long time, such as:
    • Unusual bleeding from
      the gums
    • Nosebleeds that
      happen often
    • Menstrual or vaginal
      bleeding
      that is heavier
      than normal
  • Bleeding that is severe or you cannot control
  • Red, pink, or brown urine
  • Red or black stools
    (looks like tar)
  • Coughing up or vomiting blood
  • Vomit that looks like coffee grounds
  • Unexpected pain, swelling, or joint pain
  • Headaches
  • Feeling dizzy or weak

Spinal or epidural blood clots (hematoma)

People who take ELIQUIS, and have
medicine injected into their spinal or
epidural area, or have a spinal puncture,
have a risk of forming a blood clot that can cause long-term or permanent loss of the ability to move (paralysis).

Your risk of developing a spinal or epidural blood clot is higher if:

  • A thin tube called an epidural catheter
    is placed in your back
    to
    give you
    certain medicine
  • You take NSAIDs or a medicine
    to
    prevent blood from clotting
  • You have a history of difficult or repeated epidural or spinal punctures
  • You have a history of problems with
    your spine or have had surgery on
    your spine

If you take ELIQUIS and receive spinal anesthesia or have a spinal puncture, your doctor should watch you closely for symptoms of spinal or epidural blood clots or bleeding.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any of these signs or symptoms (especially in your legs and feet) when taking ELIQUIS:

  • Tingling
  • Numbness
  • Muscle weakness

A reaction to ELIQUIS itself

A reaction to ELIQUIS can cause hives, rash, itching, and possibly trouble breathing. If you get this reaction, it will usually happen soon after you take a dose of ELIQUIS.

Get medical help right away if you have any of the following symptoms:

  • Sudden chest pain or
    chest tightness
  • Sudden swelling of your face
    or
    tongue
  • Trouble breathing
  • Wheezing
  • Feeling dizzy or faint

Talk to your doctor about any side effect that may be bothering you or that does not go away. These are not all of the possible side effects of ELIQUIS. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You are encouraged to report any side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. 1-800-FDA-1088.


Who should not take ELIQUIS?

ELIQUIS is not for patients who:

  • have artificial heart valves
  • have antiphospholipid syndrome (APS),
    especially with positive
    triple antibody testing, who have
    a history of blood clots
  • currently have certain types of abnormal bleeding
  • have had a serious allergic reaction
    to ELIQUIS

What should I discuss with my healthcare team before starting ELIQUIS?

Talk to your healthcare team about the following:

  • Kidney or liver problems
  • If you have antiphospholipid
    syndrome
  • Any other medical conditions
  • If you have ever had bleeding problems

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breastfeeding, or planning to become pregnant or breastfeed. You and your doctor should decide if you will take ELIQUIS or breastfeed. You should not do both.

Females who are able to become pregnant: talk with your healthcare provider about pregnancy planning, and your risk of severe uterine bleeding if you are treated with blood thinner medicines, including ELIQUIS.

Tell your healthcare team about all the medicines you take, include any:

  • prescription medicines
  • over-the-counter medicines
  • vitamins
  • herbal supplements

During treatment, make sure you talk to your healthcare team before you begin to take any new medication.


How should I take ELIQUIS?

Take ELIQUIS exactly as prescribed by your doctor.

Twice daily

With or without food

Do not change your dose or stop taking ELIQUIS unless your doctor tells you to.

What if I miss a dose of ELIQUIS?

If you miss a dose of ELIQUIS, take it as soon as you remember, and do not take more than one dose at the same time.

When should I refill my prescription?

If you are taking ELIQUIS for atrial fibrillation, stopping ELIQUIS may increase your risk of having a stroke. Do not
run out of ELIQUIS. Refill your prescription before
you run out.
When leaving the hospital following hip or knee replacement, be sure that
you will have ELIQUIS available to avoid missing any doses.

ELIQUIS is available in two different tablets. Your doctor or healthcare provider will determine what dose is right for you.

2.5 mg tablet

Round, with a pale yellow color

OR

5 mg tablet

Oval, with a pale orange or pink color

Note: Images do not represent actual tablet size.

On one side of each tablet, there is a number indicating the dosage
strength of the tablet (in milligrams).
On the other side, there is a
medication identification number.


What is ELIQUIS?
ELIQUIS is a prescription medicine used to:

Reduce the risk of stroke and
blood clots in people who have
atrial fibrillation (AFib),
a type of irregular heartbeat,
not caused by a heart valve
problem.

Treat blood clots in the
veins of the legs (deep vein thrombosis – DVT) or lungs
(pulmonary embolism – PE), and
reduce the risk of them occurring again.

Reduce the risk of forming a blood clot in the legs (DVT)
and lungs (PE) of people who have just had hip or knee replacement surgery.

Please see U.S. Full Prescribing Information, including Boxed WARNINGS and Medication Guide.

LOVENOX® is a registered trademark of Aventis Pharma S.A.

The product information provided in this
site is intended only for residents of the
United States. The products discussed herein may have different product labeling in
different countries.

The health information contained herein is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace discussions with
a healthcare provider. All decisions
regarding patient care must be made with a healthcare provider, considering the unique characteristics of the patient.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA.
Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088. 1-800-FDA-1088.

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SELECTED IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION & INDICATIONS

For people taking ELIQUIS® (apixaban) for atrial fibrillation: Do not stop taking ELIQUIS without talking to the doctor who prescribed it for you. Stopping ELIQUIS increases your risk of having a stroke.

ELIQUIS may need to be stopped prior to surgery or a medical or dental procedure. Your doctor will tell you when you should stop taking ELIQUIS and when you may start taking it again. If you have to stop taking ELIQUIS, your doctor may prescribe another medicine to help prevent a blood clot from forming.

ELIQUIS can cause bleeding, which can be serious, and rarely may lead to death. This is because ELIQUIS is a blood thinner medicine that reduces blood clotting.

You may have a higher risk of bleeding if you take ELIQUIS and take other medicines that increase your risk of bleeding, such as aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (called NSAIDs), warfarin (COUMADIN®), heparin, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), and other medicines to help prevent or treat blood clots. Tell your doctor about all of the medicines you take, including any over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.